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  • Keystone Flashing System:
    The Keystone Flashing System is a total approach to permanently protect masonry structures against water damage.


    Photo Captions:
    1. Thru-Wall in parapet walls with factory mitred corner.
    2. Two-piece cap to counterflash at roof with 4" in-wall receiver.
    3. Thru-Wall at Spandrels – to prevent seepage into roof insulation.
    4. Thru-Wall at Window Heads and Spandrels – extend flashing to within 1/2" of exterior wall face.
    5. Thru-Wall at Spandrels – custom formed to fit conditions with hook dam to prevent seepage into interior space.
    6. Thru-Wall at Sills – 3/16" high saw tooth ribs bond in all directions with mortar bed. 7. Thru-Wall at Water Table – saw tooth ribs with 3" spacing provides positive exterior weepage. "Life of the Building" moisture protection is provided at modest installed costs. 

    Keystone’s famous "3-way" Thru Wall Flashing mechanically bonds in the masonry joint in all directions.

    Keystone’s versatile "2-piece" Cap Flashing is a combination of either 3-way keyed thru-wall,
    or flat receiver and cap flashing insert.

    Most pre-fabricated sections are installed in a bed of mortar and interlocked. Where unexpected irregularities are encountered, the soft nature of the metal and the flashing design allows the sections to be shaped to fit without violation of its moisture tight integrity. A normal mortar joint will accommodate all the sections of Keystone Flashing.

    These flashing components are a metal system whose sections are soft enough to bend and give, yet tough enough to successfully resist moisture penetration for generations.    

  • Two Piece Cap Flashing:
     Keystone’s versatile "2-piece" Cap Flashing is a combination of either 3-way keyed thru-wall, or flat receiver and cap flashing insert.

    Use
    A preformed two piece cap flashing used for counter flashing where flat
    roofs abut rising walls.

    The receiver portion is built in during construction leaving only the locking slot exposed. After installation of the roof, the insert member is snapped in place providing a spring like hug against the base flashing. When repair or replacement of the roof is required the inset may be removed and reused.

    Types
    Four receiver types are available to suit most flashing requirements. All have a continuous locking slot and self-aligning tongue to assure proper joint alignment. Thru-wall receivers (figs. 2 and 5) have 3/16" high undercut sawtooth ribs at 3" intervals for bonding in the mortar bed. The 1" in the wall receiver is for use in existing masonry. Surface mounted receivers are supplied with or without sealant flange. The 4" in the wall flat receiver (fig. 1) is for use in areas where mortar bonding is not required. Gauge/Sizes
    Available in .015", or .018" type 302/304 stainless steel or Terne Coated Stainless Steel; 16 oz. plain or lead coated copper and aluminum with .025" receiver and .032" insert. 

    Three way bond type receivers are available in widths from 4" to 32" from the wall. All receivers have an interlocking end lap lay up 48" on the wall. Insert members are supplied 51" long to allow for a 3" end lap and 48" lay up. Installation THRU-WALL RECEIVER: Extend through the wall and turn up 2"or terminate with a 1/4" hook dam. Set with a thin bed of mortar below and above with care taken to insure the mortar completely fills the bonding keys.

    SURFACE MOUNTED RECEIVER: Secure receiver to wall with fasteners at 10" centers. Type of fastener depends on surface to which flashing is to be applied. Unless upper portion of receiver is to be covered with stucco or siding, the sealant flange is to be filled continuously with a high grade sealant.

    1" IN THE WALL RECEIVER: Saw cut existing wall to a depth of 1". Install receiver in saw cut, secure with lead wedges 10" on centers and apply a continuous bead of high grade sealant.

    4" IN THE WALL FLAT RECEIVER: Receiver extends 4" into the wall and terminates with a 1/4" hook dam. All receivers should be installed a minimum of 6" above the top of the cant strip.

    CAP FLASHING INSERTS: The cap flashing insert member is installed with an upward push into the vertical locking slot where thumb nail notches hold it securely in place. Specifications Cap flashings in walls where flat roofs abut shall be two piece type as manufactured by Keystone Flashing Co., Philadelphia, PA. Receiver shall be formed of (gauge/material) with a special vertical locking slot that requires no malleting or bending to hold the insert member in place. Combination receivers and thru-wall flashing shall have 3/16" high undercut sawtooth ribs at 3" intervals to provide a mechanical bond in the mortar bed in all three directions. The insert members shall be formed of (gauge/materials) and designed to snap lock into the receiver portion and provide a spring like hug against the base flashing. Thru-wall receivers shall be set with a thin bed of mortar below and above. Install counter flashing insert members with end joints lapped 3".

  • 3-Way Interlocking Thru Wall Flashing:
    Keystone’s famous "3-way" Thru Wall Flashing mechanically bonds in the masonry joint in all directions.   
    Use    
                           
    A preformed metal flashing designed to provide life of the building moisture protection in masonry structures. Use at floor levels, beneath sills, over lintels, continuous at spandrel beams, beneath copings and elsewhere as required.
                                                    
    Type
    Three-Way Bond Interlocking Type with 3/16" high undercut sawtooth ribs at 3" intervals to provide a three-way mechanical bond in the mortar bed and insure rapid drainage of moisture to the exterior. Interlocking feature provides for watertight joints without the use of sealant or solder except at corners and special conditions. (See Figures 7 through 12.)         

    Gauge/Sizes
    Available in type 302/304 dead soft stainless steel, Terne Coated Stainless Steel, copper, lead, coated copper and aluminum.

    For concealed applications such as floor levels, sills, lintels and spandrel beams use .015" or .018" stainless steel; 10 oz. copper or .025" aluminum. Where exposed use .015" or .018" stainless steel; .015" or .018" Terne Coated Stainless Steel; 16 oz. copper or lead coated copper or .032" aluminum.

    10 oz. copper supplied in widths to 36". Standard lengths of 49-1/2" allow for a 1-1/2" interlocking end lap. Other lengths to
    88-1/2" available on request. 

    Installation
    Concealed flashings should start 1/2" back from the exterior face of the wall, extend through the wall, stepping up at least one brick course to promote drainage and terminate with a 2" turn up at the interface. Where a turn up is impractical, the flashing should terminate with a 1/4" hook dam approximately 1" back from the inside face of the wall.

    Lintel and sill flashings should extend at least 4" beyond the jambs of the openings. Flashings at spandrel beams should be continuous. At vertical limitations the flashing should be turned up a minimum of 2" and sealed with plastic roofing cement.

    All flashings should be set with a thin bed of mortar below and above with care being taken to insure that the mortar completely fills the bonding ribs.

    Specifications
    All thru-wall flashings shall be the three-way bond interlocking type as manufactured by Keystone Flashing Co., Philadelphia, PA. Flashings shall be formed to provide a mechanical bond in the mortar bed in all three directions. Bonding features shall consist of 3/16" high undercut sawtooth ribs spaced at not more than 3" intervals. Use (gauge/material) for fully concealed flashings and (gauge/material) for flashings that are exposed. Set flashings with a thin bed of mortar below and above with end
    joints overlapping not less than 1-1/2". Furnish and install where shown on the drawings and in strict accordance with the manufacturer’s recommendations.

Installation

(1) Place a thin bed of mortar on the surface to prepare it for placement of flashing.

(2) Set flashing on the mortar and push the metal down into the mortar bed, thus filling the keys. In setting the flashing, always work from LEFT TO RIGHT. When pushing the flashing into the mortar, make sure the end keys of each piece overlap to ensure the interlocking feature of the flashing system.

(3) The flashing should be secured to the substrate backing (or in the case of block back-up, the flashing should be turned down, into the horizontal joint).        

(4) To prepare for the first layer of brick, a thin bed of mortar should be placed on the flashing surface.

(5) The brick should be placed on the mortar and tapped down to make sure the mortar is pushed into the flashing keys and forms an integral bond between the brick and the flashing.

(6) The mason then continues the accepted procedure for building up the brickwork.


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